Jockey Club Interactive Registration

Head Markings Help


Head Markings

FEW WHITE HAIRS - When present, they should be noted and their exact location described.

SCATTERED WHITE HAIRS - numerous white hairs which do not form any specffic shape. The words "heavy" or "faint" can sometimes be used in describing scattered white hairs.

PATCH OF WHITE HAIRS - a close gathering of white hairs, scattered white hairs or solid white hairs. As a general guideline, a patch of white hairs in the forehead is small enough that it can be covered by a person's thumbnail.

STAR - any major white marking found in the forehead and/or eye level.

The following terms can be used when describing STARS:

Small Star (Fig. No. 7) - a star which measures less than one and one-half inches in diameter.

Large Star (Fig. No. 8) - a star which measures three inches or more in diameter.

Diamond Shaped Star (Fig. No. 9) - shaped like a diamond.

Diagonal Star Pointed to Left (Pointed to Right) - usually narrow in shape, the top of which points toward the horse's left or right ear. The direction of the upper point should always be noted.

Horizontal Star - usually narrow in shape and lies parallel to the imaginary line connecting the top of both eyes.

Vertical Star - A star whose general shape is "up and down."

Curved Star Open to Left (Open to Right, Open to Top, Open to Bottom) (Fig. No. 12) - usually narrow and shaped like the letter "C" or a crescent moon. The "open" side of the star should always be noted.

Oval Star (Fig. No. 10) - a rounded or egg-shaped star.

Heart Shaped Star - shaped like a heart.

Triangular Star - shaped like a triangle.

Irregular Star - this term should be used when the star does not conform to any specific shape.

Pointed Star - a star which contains two or more distinct points. -- If a star contains only one distinct point (Fig. No. 11), then the direction of the point should be noted (pointed to left, pointed to right, etc.).

Mixed Star (Fig. No. 14) - a mixture of white and coat color hairs in the shape of a star. Sometimes these stars can be difficult to distinguish, and in this case, should be described as a faint star.

Bordered Star (Fig. No. 13) - the outer edge of the star is a mixture of white and coat color hairs.

Bald Face (Fig. No. 20) - The star and stripe cover both eyes, both nostrils and the muzzle.

STRIPE - a continuous vertical marking which can begin anywhere from the area between the eyes to just above the imaginary horizontal line connecting the top of the nostrils.

The following terms can be used when describing STRIPES:

Thin Stripe/Narrow Stripe (Fig. No. 16-lower portion) - about a half inch in width. If the stripe is very thin it should be described as a Line of White Hairs.

Wide Stripe/Broad Stripe (Fig. No. 18) - about two or three inches in width.

Mixed Stripe - contains a mixture of white and coat color hairs. Can be narrow, wide, etc.

Bordered Stripe (Fig. No. 13) - the outer edge of the stripe is a mixture of white and coat color hairs. Can be narrow, wide, etc.

Bordered Flesh Colored Stripe - the outer edge of the stripe contains solid white or mixed white hairs, while the center of the stripe is pink in color. Can be narrow, wide, etc.

Broken Stripe (Fig. No. 17) - The stripe is disconnected from itself at one or more points.

Tapering Stripe - a stripe which narrows continuously and ends in a point.

Irregular Stripe - a stripe whose width, direction and course vary.

HELPFUL HINTS FOR DESCRIBING STRIPES: SNIP - any disconnected marking found BETWEEN THE NOSTRILS. A snip can be solid white, flesh colored or bordered. (See above for the definition of "bordered" and other terms used to describe markings).

PATCH - any separate marking found on the upper lip, lower lip or under lip. A patch can be solid white, flesh colored or mixed.

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: A majority of good, concise head markings can be written using only the terms as outlined in this section. Be sure to identify each major marking and use the descriptive words and phrases whenever necessary.